The Royal pain

It sounded almost comical, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle — the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — announcing a Declaration of Independence — they would “step back” as senior Royals, which comes close to abdicating their Royalty. Call it a Megxit in which they would seek to become financially independent and carve out a “Progressive” role within the Royal hierarchy. Progressive and Royalty are a contradiction in terms.

Bye, bye Royal Family

Are they planning a Go Fund Me page? Probably not. Does Harry have any job skills other than military and diplomacy and the gift of looking great in a fancy uniform? Does Meghan go back to a cheesy TV series? If so, will Harry be a stay-at-home dad?

They can’t count on his grandmom (the Queen) to babysit. By all accounts, the Queen was distressed not to have been notified in advance. That was rude and the move by the kids reveals a schism in the Royal household, with Harry being at odds with his elder brother (and future King) Prince William.

So why do we care? Many of us don’t, but even more Americans have a strange fascination with the Royal Family. I know that locally for decades any time the Daily News put the Royals on Page One — even before the adored Princess Diana — street sales would go up. (Other circulation drivers — Muhammad Ali and Frank Rizzo).

Princess Diana is the unseen hand behind her son and daughter-in-law’s decision. As we know, innocent teenager Diana was led into a false marriage, which made her miserable while in it, and then was mercilessly hounded (to her death) by the media after she (like the U.S.A.) declared her independence from the Royal Pains.

The ferocious British media has been intrusive, and sometimes unkind to Meghan, and her husband does not want to her to suffer as did his mother. Good bloke.

At first blush, being born to Royalty sounds like a good deal, the best of everything — schools, homes, food, clothing, jobs — with endless public appearances and scrutiny being the price for a Royal, guaranteed lifetime income.

Harry and Meghan have decided the cost is too great.

11 thoughts on “The Royal pain”

  1. Good for them! It’s very difficult standing up and asserting yourself for any of us and certainly exponentially more so if you are part of The Firm, so to speak. I wish them and their son well and happiness ever after. They certainly don’t need money. They can do whatever they want. They will live well.

  2. The people of Great Britain have to be among the dumbest on Earth. To be forced to financially support an ever-growing number of Royal Parasites — big winners in the Sperm Lottery — in a country struggling to be relevant is beyond comprehension. Harry and Meghan are getting out of Dodge before the people wake up and toss out the whole gang of ‘Royals.’

    1. Coincidentally, in December, one of my cousins who lives in the southwestern part of the UK, opined in his email how he wished they would get rid of the unelected “House of Lords”….”former politicians, business people, or those born into the right family! They all have been awarded peerages (Lords/Ladies, etc.) It costs us a fortune and produces nothing!”

  3. Stu,

    You raise an interesting point about Americans having a most curious and enduring interest in the Royal Family. As a Canadian, I’ve never understood this, and would love to hear your thoughts. I mean, you guys booted the Brits out back in 1776 right? Threw off the yoke of tyranny, as it were. Yet I think Americans get more googly-eyed over the Royals than us frozen colonists up north do. And the Queen is still, legally, our head of state. Only thing I’ve always wanted to know is what is in her purse.

    1. Mr. Foster, I cannot speak for all Americans, but I suspect we seem enamored of your Royals because we are fascinated with people who are paid a fortune for doing nothing (as it reminds us of our politicians, who like the Royals, live like kings and queens on the taxpayers’ dime). Plus we like their accents.

      1. Vincent,
        Yes, for a bunch of freeloaders, they are always well-dressed and impeccably polite. Maybe given the times we live in it’s almost worth subsidizing a clan who keep such etiquette alive? Or we could just all buy a box set of Downton Abbey.

        1. Along those lines, Mr. Foster, I am reminded of a line from a song taken from My Fair Lady: “The French don’t care what they do, actually, so long as they pronounce it properly.”

    2. The only explanation is that somehow some Americans feel unworthy. 🙂
      Maybe it’s all those Brit TV shows. It IS a fascinating institution. I prefer our Founders.
      I prefer merit over inheritance.

  4. HAPPY THURSDAY !!!
    ( I would have been here sooner, but I had to grease the wheels on my soap box ! )
    ( coincidentally, I was watching Downton Abbey on Amazon )
    Pallie,
    Interesting topic, as always. Where to begin . I wasn’t born with a silver spoon up my ————
    Americans have always been fond of pomp and circumstance. Is it because of our roots to the kingdom across the pond ? If you take a minute to look back, high society liked to “dress to the 9s”. Doesn’t make them any better, but then again, there’s no Wal-Mart on Fifth Avenue !
    Me thinks that part of the issue with the royals is this. As you point out, To be a member of the family, you must play the part. The young wants, but they don’t WANT to work for it. Nothing new. I knew people in business a million years ago. The offspring would rather play tennis and be part of the jet set, rather than mind the store and learn the business. This is a common problem all across the financial spectrum.
    Pallie, I’m trying to understand your thoughts on Princess Diana. I think that marrying is hard enough when you think that you are in love. (#3 for me!) When you’re 17 and you marry a guy almost twice your age – WTF !. At least if your chasing money and your a playboy centerfold and your new husband is 90, real love $$$$$$$$$$ lasts a long time (sic). Diana was in the right world, just with the wrong guy. Her job was to bear heirs to the throne. Period. That wasn’t what she wanted. Diana was a very good ambassador for the royals. Chas, not so much.
    Lastly. When the kids turn in their crowns, how much money do they walk away with. I was lucky in my divorce ( one and only ) I not only had the shirt on my back, but I had a bank book and stuff………..
    Tony

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