6 things to know about the lunar landing

It was July 20, 1969, when perceptions of who we were, aboard planet earth, changed forever. Man (meaning humankind) had reached the moon, an accomplishment beyond dreams. The humans were Americans, giving a unique lift to a unique culture, one that accepts challenges.

We did it on live TV, with all the world watching, and with most praying for our success.

There is a lot I would like to say about that day, but home office technical problems are preventing that, so I will have to satisfy myself with what looks like a click bait post. Sorry.

My last post was long, this one is short: A compilation of facts you might not know about the stunning Apollo 11 mission:

1- Commander Neil Armstrong’s said this as he climbed down toward the lunar surface: “I’m going to jump off the ladder now.” That was followed by the better-known, “One small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.”

2- 400,000 people were involved in the effort to land Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon — and return them safely, which was the mandate of President John F. Kennedy.

3- Aldrin said the moon smelled like a mixture of charcoal and water. (I know what you’re thinking: How could he smell in his space suit? Ask Popular Science, which reported that fact.)

4- The crew’s first meal on the moon was bacon and coffee, years before bacon became a “thing.”

5- The American Flag planted on the moon was custom made with an aluminum rod that created the effect that the flag was “flying.”

6- Smoking was permitted in the Kennedy Space Center Launch Control(!)

7- [Optional] It actually did happen.

5 thoughts on “6 things to know about the lunar landing”

  1. In case you wanted an answer about number 3: The astronauts tracked in a lot of lunar dust on their outfits, and they could smell it in the capsule after they removed their suits.

  2. Why aren’t we still going back. Jeff Bezos hasn’t been able to repeat the experiment. I’ve been bombarded by a lot of “doubt theories.” It has to be real but no one has gone to our beloved natural satellite recently.

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